MillerCoors Down – Except ‘Craft’

Brewer is down 2.5% in 3rd quarter

Domestic sales of MillerCoors brands to retailers were down 2.5% for the fiscal third-quarter, the beer brewer’s London parent company, SABMiller reported.

The one bright spot? Faux craft and imporats. Beers from its Tenth and Blake craft brew division grew in the double digits.
It reported 25% growth for Blue Moon in the quarter and 24.5% for the fiscal year to date. Its Peroni beer volume grew 6.9% for the quarter and 6.8% for the fiscal year-to-date. The company’s local Leinenkugel brand grew just 1.9% for the quarter and 7.7% for the fiscal year-to-date.

MillerCoors’ premium light brand volumes fell by less than 1 percent for the quarter that ended Dec. 31. Miller Lite experienced a low single-digit decline while Coors Light volume grew slightly. MillerCoors’ lower-priced brands had sales volume declines in the mid single-digits.

Domestic sales to wholesalers declined 2.2 percent during the period.

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Comments

  1. Tlangle1 says

    It is perhaps time to begin to rethink the derogatives so readliy slung about on this board regarding “better” beer. With the lifting of the sales ceiling to 6MM bbls to keep you buddy Koch in the low tax bracket, the truth about the movemtn has been clearly articulated. “Craft” is not equal to size, but something else, which beer snobs can’t quite articulate.
    I, personally, am not a big fan of American Light Lager’s either. But I’ve tasted my share of beer that fits the “craft” definition that tasted like congealed dog sweat.
    We’re either collectively about raising the quality of beer, or something else, which no-one here seems to be able to clearly define.

  2. aorrick says

    I certainly understand your point here. I can’t speak for anyone else, and I won’t, but my main issue with these companies, and one of the many reasons I won’t drink their beer is that they seem to me to be much more willing to engage in, I don’t know, capitalist warfare maybe, than the small breweries my friends and I work for or own. I come from a state where you can’t throw rocks without hitting breweries, and almost none it leaves the state due to our passion for local and craft. One of the most motivating factors for me in wanting to get into the business is that the product comes with a face. Not one on a billboard. But the folks behind the product want to be a part of your enjoyment of the product. So when I see news like AB suing Dogfish Head because a beer name(s) is ‘too generic’, I get at least a little annoyed. It makes me believe that they are much more concerned with putting your money into their bank account than they are with putting their good beer into your glass. And that goes against the grain when I think of my passion for the craft of brewing. Yes, I want to earn a living at this. Yes, I want to earn a GOOD living at this. But foremost, I want to share my craft with anyone willing to celebrate it with me. You are right that it is hard to articulate the spirit and passion of beer and brewing. But I have to assume that some of that spirit and passion is sacrificed when you pay lots of money for your team of lawyers to sue other breweries. So, I choose to support the business of beer and not the business of taking other business. Just my choice.

  3. Tash says

    Tlangle1 wrote: It is perhaps time to begin to rethink the derogatives so readliy slung about on this board regarding “better” beer. With the lifting of the sales ceiling to 6MM bbls to keep you buddy Koch in the low tax bracket, the truth about the movemtn has been clearly articulated. “Craft” is not equal to size, but something else, which beer snobs can’t quite articulate.
    I, personally, am not a big fan of American Light Lager’s either. But I’ve tasted my share of beer that fits the “craft” definition that tasted like congealed dog sweat.
    We’re either collectively about raising the quality of beer, or something else, which no-one here seems to be able to clearly define.

    Well, you’re wrong here… There was NO tax manuvering for Sam Adams. All the BA did was raise the barrelage to 6 million barrels. If they didn’t and let Sam Adams leave the definition of Craft Brewer…the BA would lose that statistic…a drop of over 2 million barrels in ‘craft production’. FYI, Sam Adams pays the full tax on barrelage after the first 60,000bbls. All they got was a permission slip stating they were still craft.

    Oh, how do you know what congealed dog sweat tastes like?

  4. SRB says

    Like it or not, there is a growing segment of beer drinkers that are not interested in supporting a multi-national corporation regardless if the beer they produce is good or not. I have many examples of family and friends that display dismay when I share with them that Blue Moon is SabMiller. They think the beer tastes good enough to come back but when the wizard behind the curtain is revealed they sigh and move on. Sure Blue Moon is produced in the U.S. and jobs are created. That is important. But to people like me the fact that the parent company is foreign owned ($$$ leaving the states) changes the equation. Sam Adams is a large, publicly owned corporation. But they remain based in the United States and Koch does an outstanding job of sustaining an ability for beer drinkers to directly connect. And the beer is really good. I still choose a Full Sail or a Deschutes for a large regional. (see below)
    On amount of BBLs per year. I would wager that a large majority of craft brew fans do not key in on “craft” as the amount barrels a year a brewery produces but on its quality and as aorrick points to its “face” or mission. Where they are based remains very important to some people. A giant globalized behemoth just doesn’t sit well with a lot of people, for business, social and environmental reasons. Local, Regional, National, Continental then Global. This actually points to my personal consumption of craft beer. I drink a lot of Pacific Northwest beer. Lucky me we are awash in great craft beer. Craft imports? Once in a Blue Moon. Yeah, I know I am missing out. But I stand behind my beliefs. 🙂

  5. admin says

    The word faux is used by the editor to describe a brand that intentionally markets itself as a “craft” brand by a major brewery without that brewery clearing identifying who owns the brand. That, in my opinion, is deceptive. it’s not about whether the beer is of good quality. That has never been put into question. The major brewers are capable of brewing exceptional beers. But consumers should know who owns a brand they drink — it is part of the reason consumers enjoy drinking authentic craft beer.