Michelob Rye India Pale Ale

Michelob adds a new beer in its Fall/Winter Sampler Pack — a Rye India Pale Ale

The Rye P.A. and Michelob Bavarian Style Wheat, first introduced in 2006, are available only in the sampler pack, which comes in 12- and 24-bottle sizes. They are joined by Michelob Pale Ale and Michelob Porter.

Michelob, a subsidiary of Anheuser-Busch InBev, has handed out samples of both Rye P.A. as well as Tomahop Double Rye-PA (with 97 International Bitterness Units) as beer festivals across the country. “We crafted Michelob Rye P.A. using feedback on many versions of the recipe that we shared . . . ” said Michelob brewmaster Adam Goodson. “Rye is a challenging grain to use in brewing and adds considerable malt flavor complexity compared to barley alone. Michelob Rye P.A.’s intense hop flavors and dry-hopped aromas complement the rye’s spicy undertones.”

The Rye P.A. is 5.9% abv and 50 IBU.

Every sampler pack includes a flighting sheet with tasting notes and a summary of each beer’s ingredients to reveal how the brewmasters’ recipes impact the colors, aromas and flavors found among the different styles. The packs will be available through February 2010.

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Comments

  1. nohandslance says

    Anyone see the add this weekend for Bud Light Bold Wheat ale? It was advertised here in Nevada, but no retail store I visited knew of such a product.

  2. REV says

    I saw it as well here in Washington, the ad that is. Haven’t even looked for it in the stores. I would like to try the RPA’s however.

  3. monkeybrewer says

    saw it NY but with none available in local beer store…it looks unfiltered…how can they sleep at night?! 🙂

  4. Jephro says

    Unfiltered, Bold and Light… WOW. How many “International Drinkability Units” do you think it has?

  5. LokeBrewSF says

    There was a press release about this. It is supposed to be available sometime in October. The press release was ridiculously awesome (as awesome as anything ABInBev can be, so not very much at all).

    WHEAT = FLAVOR!

  6. nohandslance says

    BrewinLou wrote: How long will it be before Inbud makes a barrel aged barleywine?

    It is most likely aging in some beechwood barrel as we speak. It is only a matter of time. Does anyone remember the Bavarian Hefeweizen AB put out in 1995 called Crossroads? They brewed it at the Fort Collins brewery and did a test run in the Western US market, It must have been good because I can remember the name 13 years later.

  7. samhuff says

    The Rye IPA (the e in Rye is a play on the I) isn’t bad, it lacks aroma and hop flavor that i’d expect from just about every IPA though. Maybe swithc out the hops for some Centennial and maybe Magnums for bittering?

    The Bavarian Wheat is just plain good. It pretty much hits the mark for a wheat beer with the spicy and fruity notes that I expect. Not to mention that it has great “drinkability” 😉

    Picked up the sampler at the local Sam’s Club.

  8. beertje46 says

    nohandslance wrote: It is most likely aging in some beechwood barrel as we speak. It is only a matter of time. Does anyone remember the Bavarian Hefeweizen AB put out in 1995 called Crossroads? They brewed it at the Fort Collins brewery and did a test run in the Western US market, It must have been good because I can remember the name 13 years later.

    I remember the Crossroads. The only reason I remember the name is Brimstone Brewing in Baltimore bought multiple truck loads of the ex-crossroads packaging. These were built cases: MC, six-packs inserted and filled with bottles. Seems the owner paid les than a dollar per case.

  9. Geoff Logan says

    I had both of these beers at a friends wedding this past weekend. The Rye PA was not my favorite. The Michelob PA is very similar. But for their market, it makes sense to not go crazy. They were just not my thing. The Wheat was actually good. A pleasant surprise.

    Geoff Logan
    Head Brewer
    AleWerks
    Williamsburg, VA

  10. SoCalBrewer says

    I know that this is an old string but I put off trying them both for good reason. RyePA great name… weak beer and the wheat was not my thing and I poured one out. I still have one in my fridge if anyone is interested.

    I guess it all comes down to taste, and everyone is different.

  11. BH Tavern says

    SoCalBrewer wrote: I know that this is an old string but I put off trying them both for good reason. RyePA great name… weak beer and the wheat was not my thing and I poured one out. I still have one in my fridge if anyone is interested.

    I guess it all comes down to taste, and everyone is different.

    Great name… borrowed from about a dozen other craft breweries that have been calling their hoppy pale rye beers “rye-pa” “R.I.P-A” or any other number of derivations thereof for a decade or more. Rate beer has at least 9 listed. This company which has built itself on nothing but advertising is simply trying to cash in on what it sees as a craft beer trend. Buying IPA from a macro is like buying cave aged washed rind cheese from Kraft.

  12. LuskusDelph says

    BH Tavern wrote: …Buying IPA from a macro is like buying cave aged washed rind cheese from Kraft.

    That’s probably true nowadays, but it certainly wasn’t always the case.

    Then again, you’re probably not old enough to remember Ballantine IPA… it was a world class beer made with a lot of care (and a railcar full of hops) by what was once the third largest brewer in the country, and few (if any) micro IPAs have come close being nearly as good as this one was 40 years ago. Great body, pungently bitter, and the aroma when you popped open a bottle was literally like sticking your head in a bag of hop cones. Even Michael Jackson waxed poetic about it and truly lamented it’s dumbing down in the 1980’s and it’s eventual total disappearance.

    The big boys can still do it if they wanted to. And eventually, I believe that they probably will.
    Right now though, they’re just too busy making what most beer drinkers want.

  13. beertje46 says

    LuskusDelph wrote: That’s probably true nowadays, but it certainly wasn’t always the case.

    Then again, you’re probably not old enough to remember Ballantine IPA… it was a world class beer made with a lot of care (and a railcar full of hops) by what was once the third largest brewer in the country, and few (if any) micro IPAs have come close being nearly as good as this one was 40 years ago. Great body, pungently bitter, and the aroma when you popped open a bottle was literally like sticking your head in a bag of hop cones. Even Michael Jackson waxed poetic about it and truly lamented it’s dumbing down in the 1980’s and it’s eventual total disappearance.

    The big boys can still do it if they wanted to. And eventually, I believe that they probably will.
    Right now though, they’re just too busy making what most beer drinkers want.

    I remember Ballantine IPA. Bonus question, no googles allowed; What was the hop used in Ballantine IPA?

    Jephro wrote: Is that what Martin Crane drank on the sitcom Frasier?

    Indeed.

  14. Jephro says

    Going with the Wa State Theme…. Cascade or Willamette? (or perhaps Ranier -if they were even around then)